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Public Enemy still fighting the power in 'Star Trek Beyond'

It takes a Federation of millions to hold them back.

Public Enemy makes a major cameo of sorts in 'Star Trek Beyond' — with the rap band's iconic anthem, 'Fight the Power,' having apparently survived deep into the 23rd Century.

And founder Chuck D told the Daily News that he was pleased to have his tune used for the scene in which the underdog Enterprise crew braces for a showdown with an alien oppressor.

'It shows you how much of a 'Star Trek' fan I am,' the rapper said from Cleveland, where his new band, Prophets of Rage, played a protest gig against the Republican National Convention.

'Star Trek' breaking boundaries 50 years after its TV inception

'I never was a fan of 'Star Wars,' never seen it. But 'Star Trek' was different to me.

'Growing up, I just liked space, it was the final frontier,' he adds. 'I just got it.'

When 'Star Trek' was first beamed onto television sets 50 years ago this September — long before Carlton Douglas Ridenhour became known by his famous stage name — he was just 6 years old and didn't really get the show. By the time the series went into syndication a few years later, though, the Queens native was on board with 'Star Trek' creator Gene Roddenberry's hopeful five-year mission.

This, after all, was a show airing during the Cold War that showed a Russian officer as a hero. It also featured the first high-profile interracial kiss on television between Nichelle Nichol's Lt. Uhura and William Shatner's Captain Kirk.

'Gene Roddenberry and ('The Twilight Zone' creator) Rod Serling kind of reached into a better place with their fiction, trying to make it a reality,' said Chuck D. 'I always dug that.

Rap fans of a certain age may also remember that Public Enemy stuck a 'Star Trek' tribute in the video for the group's 1994 song, 'Give It Up.' In the video, puppet versions of Chuck D and hype-man Flavor Flav patrol the universe in a spaceship with a familiar looking bridge.

Here on Earth, though, Chuck D doesn't seem as optimistic about the real future. He feels the lyrics of 'Fight the Power' and the message of battling the abuses of institutionalized power are as relevant now as they were when the song was first released in 1989.

Frankly, he doesn't seem so convinced the human species will make it to the real 23rd Century.

Rap fans of a certain age may also remember that Public Enemy stuck a 'Star Trek' tribute in the video for the group's 1994 song, 'Give It Up.' In the video, puppet versions of Chuck D and hype-man Flavor Flav patrol the universe in a spaceship with a familiar looking bridge.

Here on Earth, though, Chuck D doesn't seem as optimistic about the real future. He feels the lyrics of 'Fight the Power' and the message of battling the abuses of institutionalized power are as relevant now as they were when the song was first released in 1989.

Frankly, he doesn't seem so convinced the human species will make it to the real 23rd Century.

nydailynews.com

 
 

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